Blessing the Children on Shabbat

Posted on June 18th, 2018
by Ariela Pelaia for ThoughtCo.
 

Learn Family Shabbat Blessings
 

Every week as the sun sets on Friday evening the Jewish holiday of Shabbat begins. This day of rest lasts until havdalah is said as the sun sets on Saturday and is dedicated to family, community and spiritual renewal.

Special Blessings

Traditionally Shabbat includes special blessings that are said over the children on Friday night. How these blessings are said varies from home to home. Customarily it is the father who blesses the children by laying his hands on their heads and reciting the blessings below.

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Shabbat Fun for Kids

Posted on June 11th, 2018
From aish.com

 

Tried-and-true ways to make Shabbat great for kids.


Let’s face it. Shabbat has a lot of don'ts and can'ts.

The challenge for parents is to convey how all the “restrictions” actually open up an exciting new dimension of fun. With the right approach, Shabbat becomes the kids’ favorite day, which they anticipate with excitement all week long.

Here are some tried-and-true ways to make Shabbat great for kids:

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5 Gadgets to Help Sabbath Observers

Posted on June 4th, 2018
Staff of myjewishlearning.com

 

From a foldable hot plate to a Shabbat light bulb, these devices help make the Sabbath easier for observant Jews.


The Sabbath is the day of rest, God’s break from creation and humanity’s respite from weekday toil. But for observant Jews, Shabbat also can be a challenge.

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The Secret to the Best Shabbat? Pizza.

Posted on May 28th, 2018
BY ALLA UMANSKIY for Kveller


If my kids remember anything about their childhood once they’re grown, I hope they remember the pizza. In our family, Friday night is pizza night — and it’s our non-traditional version of Shabbat dinner.

 

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Defending the State of Israel, One Kiddush at a Time

Posted on May 21st, 2018
Cantor David Frommer for ReformJudaism.org


Even after two months of Basic Training as a volunteer in the Israel Defense Forces, I still tried to shrink behind someone else whenever the Mempay (Company Commander) asked us a question. Basic Training was not an environment in which volunteering for anything beyond showing up was advisable. Six days of every week were packed with stressful discipline, demoralizing surprises, and chaotic uncertainty, and even with the support of my fellow volunteers, Hebrew comprehension and homesickness were a daily struggle.

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